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Other content tagged: family-centred care

Management and outcomes of extreme preterm birth

The survival and morbidity rates of babies born extremely preterm are linked to care management before and after birth, which tends to vary a lot. Conclusions of a recently published clinical update show that family centred care, preventive measures before pregnancy and the use of guidelines and legislation are key factors for improving health outcomes. Extreme preterm birth is defined as birth before 28 weeks of gestation. The survival and health status of babies…
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Promoting good practice in newborn temperature regulation: Dr. Alok Sharma’s story

Prelude The mother was in preterm labour and the baby was about to be born at 24 weeks. As a consultant neonatologist at Southampton University Hospital, this was not an unusual situation for Dr. Alok Sharma. What was perhaps unusual at the time was how Alok was preparing to deal with this preterm birth. Normally babies born at this gestational age are intubated and ventilated immediately but this time, Alok wanted to avoid this. He had noticed time and again…
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Global analysis of neonatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic – a healthcare providers’ perspective

With COVID-19 disrupting neonatal health systems globally, a group of experts undertook a thematic analysis of healthcare providers’ experiences using a disseminated online survey. Results show high levels of stress on healthcare providers, disruption of newborn care practices, and lack of guidelines regarding preterm newborns and babies with low birthweight (LBW) during the pandemic. There is an urgent need to protect life-saving interventions. The implementation of the Every Newborn Action Plan in 2014 by…
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Preterm care during COVID-19 and the survival benefit of kangaroo mother care

Given the disruption of neonatal health services through the COVID-19 pandemic, a two-scenarios-analysis was conducted to weigh the risk of not implementing kangaroo mother care (KMC) among neonates with neonatal deaths from COVID-19. The undeniable survival benefit of KMC far outweighs the small risk of death due to the virus and encourage its practice. There are conflicting global guidelines on mother-newborn care during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly regarding kangaroo mother care…
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Factors Influencing Implementation of Family-Centred Care in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)

Being in the NICU is a very stressful experience for infants. The stress level even increases when babies are separated from their parents. This can be avoided with Family-Centred Care (FCC), which involves parents in the care for their infants in order to reduce the stress on newborns and parents. Even though research shows that interactions with parents lead to multiple beneficial effects for both parents and infants, including lowering the stress level for…
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Non‐evidence‐based beliefs increase inequalities in the provision of infant‐ and family‐centred neonatal care

Many hospitals in the world still do not recognise the importance and benefits of family-centred care. This hinders parents to engage in potentially life-saving care procedures, like kangaroo mother care or breastfeeding. In a scientific study, Mendizabal-Espinosa and Warren identified obstacles regarding the implementation of family-centred care in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) of two publicly funded hospitals in Mexico. Data was gathered during a 10-month time period, by observing 29 parents (21 mothers…
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British Association of Perinatal Medicine’s (BAPM) webinar on prioritising family-integrated Care

Why is it relevant to consider families as primary caregivers of their baby? What are the effects of mother-infant separations and what are the four C’s of closeness? Among others, those were the questions addressed by the webinar of the British Association for Perinatal Medicine (BAPM) – a partner of the FiCare research group.  A set of excellent international speakers gave presentations all under the heading of “Getting to Zero Separation: Prioritising Family Integrated Care for our new normal” and…
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Family-centred care in times of the pandemic

An interview with Atle Moen Dear Dr Moen, In your paper „If parents were a drug“ [accessible via Wiley Online Library], you describe how involving parents in care procedures and giving them an opportunity to provide skin-to-skin care, has proven to be beneficial for hospitalised newborns in short and long-term outcomes. You also claim that if these evidence-based benefits could be administered in form of a drug, the common practice would most likely be to give this drug to the…
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If parents were a drug

Parents have a huge impact on stress and pain and thus the wellbeing of their infants during neonatal intensive care. If this effect could be achieved with a drug that has no side-effects, this drug would undoubtedly be standard of care. This drug is not available, while parents usually are. Although neonatal care has made tremendous improvements during the last years, impaired long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is still a major issue in infants that need intensive care treatment. Doctor Atle Moen…
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eSeminar on support of parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)

How can you support parents in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)? Who would know better than someone who has been affected herself? Learn more in the eSeminar by the Neonatal Care Academy with Silke Mader, Chairwoman of the Executive Board and co-founder of the European Foundation for the Care of Newborn Infants (EFCNI). Silke shares the parent perspective on welcoming parents and the family 24 hours a day and…
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