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Other content tagged: news research

Join the RECAP preterm E-Learning course

You are a researcher in the fields of neonatology, epidemiology, and psychology and are interested to learn more about cohorts, registers, and the use of the RECAP preterm Cohort Platform? Discover the RECAP preterm E-Learning course!  The RECAP preterm Cohort Platform is a sustainable, geographically diverse, and multidisciplinary database of national and European cohorts of babies born very preterm or with very low birth weight. It contains cohorts constituted over a 30-year time span and…
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EFCNI involved in new study on blood transfusions in preterm babies

Most preterm babies admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) receive blood transfusions. Some neonates, however, receive blood transfusions even though these transfusions may not be necessary, cause side effects or even harm. Therefore, the International Neonatal tranSfusion PoInt pREvalence study (INSPIRE) aims to describe the current state and indications for blood transfusions among preterm babies in Europe. Although most preterm babies receive blood transfusions in the NICU, there are no international guidelines that have…
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Born too small or too soon and the risk for developing psychiatric disorders

In their new publication, the Adults born Preterm International Collaboration (APIC) combined data from ten studies on the question whether individuals born very preterm and/or at very low birthweight have a higher risk of developing psychiatric disorders later in life. Compared to individuals born full-term and/or at normal weight, they have a clearly higher risk for several disorders in the spectrum of psychiatry; however, absolute numbers are low in both groups. Does very preterm…
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The changing face of neonatal intensive care for infants born extremely preterm

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have analysed changes in attitude, physical environment, staffing and medical treatment within neonatal intensive care to identify the changes’ impact on extremely preterm (EP) babies. Applying an evidence-based approach is key to adapting to those changes without compromising the health of preterm babies. Neonatal intensive care for infants born extremely preterm (<28 weeks’ gestation) has changed dramatically over the past years, beginning with the rudimentary care of the…
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Maternal stress, depression, and attachment in the NICU, before and during the COVID pandemic

A study from the University of Geneva analysed the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on mothers’ postnatal depression, stress, and their attachment process with the baby. The results showed a trend of increased depression and stress symptoms in mothers during COVID-19, which also challenged the attachment process. Higher levels of depression and anxiety are believed to be part of women's birthing and post-partum experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, if a preterm baby requires hospitalisation, the mother faces not only…
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Home phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia in term-born babies

A multicentre randomised clinical trial study in Sweden investigated if home phototherapy could be a safe alternative to inpatient phototherapy for otherwise healthy newborn infants with hyperbilirubinemia. Phototherapy in the hospital in infants with neonatal jaundice is a safe and effective treatment without major side effects. The development of fibre optic equipment has made the choice of home phototherapy possible. In a first randomised controlled trial in Sweden comparing home phototherapy with hospital phototherapy, 147…
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Are commercially available formulations a possible alternative for home parenteral nutrition for children?

A descriptive cross-sectional study examined the best option for paediatric patients under home parenteral nutrition (PN), comparing standardised parenteral nutrition with individually tailored prescriptions in 24 infants and children. Currently, guidelines recommend the use of individual prescriptions for home PN in paediatric patients. While the nutrient composition of individualised PN is optimally tailored to each patient’s needs, it usually has a shelf life of only a few days. In contrast, commercially available standardised PN often…
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Follow-up of neonatal and paediatric patients: An evaluation of three case studies

Data collection and follow-up are essential for neonatal care. At Emma Children’s Hospital, Amsterdam UMC, the “Follow Me” programme was implemented and evaluated to gain insights into long-term health outcomes, and to improve follow-up care and practice in the end. Results show solid data collection but a lack of indicators to monitor the programme’s effectiveness and performance, and highlight a need for a more holistic approach to managing care services.  To date, little is known…
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Docosahexaenoic acid (an omega-3) supplementation during pregnancy to reduce early preterm birth: new findings

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), provided as a prenatal omega-3 supplement, could reduce early preterm birth (EPB), as a recent study suggests. Researchers conducted a study with 1032 participants in the USA comparing a dose of 1000 mg to the standard prenatal dose of 200 mg of DHA. Results show better outcomes with 1000 mg DHA daily than 200 mg in reducing EPB if participants had low DHA status at enrolment.   Early preterm birth (EPB) is defined…
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Extreme heat exposure as an increased risk for preterm birth and stillbirth – results from two studies

Climate change causes more frequent and extreme heatwaves, resulting in higher temperatures around the world. Several studies have found that extreme heat in pregnancy may lead to adverse birth outcomes. For this purpose, two studies in different settings (one in the United States and one in lower- to middle-income countries) have addressed this issue. Both studies found, that exposure to extreme heat waves is associated with adverse birth outcomes, such as preterm birth. Extreme weather…
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