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Other content tagged: news research

A cost-consequences analysis on increased utilisation of triple chamber bag parenteral nutrition

The safety of parenteral nutrition (PN) remains a concern in preterm neonates, impacting clinical outcomes and health-care-resource use and costs. This cost-consequence analysis assessed national-level impacts of a 10-percentage point increase in use of industry-prepared three-chamber bags (3CBs) on clinical outcomes, healthcare resources, and hospital budgets across seven European countries estimating the impact on compounding error harm and bloodstream infection (BSI) rates, staff time, and annual hospital budget. Due to mostly human errors during the compounding and preparation processes, manually…
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“Small for Gestational Age” lowers cognitive performance from infancy to adulthood

Cognitive performance in childhood can be negatively impacted if an infant was Small for Gestational Age (SGA, birthweight <10% for gestation). As existing research did not show coinciding results on whether lower IQ scores continue to be present in adulthood, Eves et al. conducted an observational study to assess differences in IQ scores between SGA adults and Appropriate for Gestational Age (AGA) adults. The study compared the impact of low familial socioeconomic status and quality…
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Apply for a post-doctoral funding from the Paris Region and European Union

The Paris Region is one of the most exceptional places to live and thrive in. The Paris Region Fellowship Programme (ParisRegionFP) contributes in this dynamic by strengthening the research capacity and international influence of the Paris Region, in France. The aim of the ParisRegionFP is to foster excellence in research, by training and developing international careers of outstanding researchers at post-doctoral level from a large panel of disciplines and of all…
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New international study on skin care practices in extremely preterm infants – participants requested

EFCNI is glad to support this survey from the University of Sydney that aims to investigate geographical variation in skin management practices in preterm infants born ≤ 27 weeks of gestation. The University of Sydney therefore requests nurses and doctors to participate in this global, ethically approved research study. This will provide a great opportunity for increasing knowledge and improving skin management practices for extremely preterm babies. To participate, a nurse or…
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A new study investigates the effects of the lockdown on preterm births worldwide

During the corona pandemic earlier this year, many countries experienced lockdowns and restrictions in public life. Many gynaecologists and neonatologists observed remarkable findings during this time: the rate of preterm births, especially of very preterm births, dropped significantly. In Denmark, for instance, experts reported a 90 % decrease in preterm births, while in Ireland, births with children of very low birth weight decreased by more than 70 %. The University of Manitoba…
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Pasteurisation of human milk can deactivate the coronavirus and ensures safety for milk donation

If a newborn infant cannot be breastfed, the best alternative nutrition for babies born with a very low birth weight is donated human milk. During the present pandemic caused by the coronavirus, using donor milk could, however, raise safety concerns. The study “holder pasteurisation of donated human milk is effective in inactivating SARS-CoV-2” conducted at the University of Toronto, now showed that donor human milk is safe to use after pasteurisation, as the heating process eliminates potential contamination by the…
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Reasons for ROP occurrence and a new option of treatment: an interview with Professor Ann Hellström

Dear Professor Hellström, Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is an eye disease that only occurs in very preterm babies (usually preterm babies born before the 31st week or born with a birth weight below 1250 g). What exactly happens in the back of the eye, when a child develops an ROP and why does this occur? When a child develops ROP the development of the neurons and the vessels (neuro-vascular) in the retina (the part at the back of the eye…
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RECAP Winter School: Early bird fee until 30th of June!

Are you a researcher in the fields of neonatology or epidemiology who wishes to learn how to use data from cohorts and registers? Then join the RECAP Winter School from 29 November- 3 December 2020 in Munich, Germany. Register until 30th of June to get an early bird fee! Through a mixture of lectures and workshops, you will learn about existing very preterm cohorts in Europe, new research on children and adults born very preterm based on pooled data, and…
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Family-centred care in times of the pandemic

An interview with Atle Moen Dear Dr Moen, In your paper „If parents were a drug“ [accessible via Wiley Online Library], you describe how involving parents in care procedures and giving them an opportunity to provide skin-to-skin care, has proven to be beneficial for hospitalised newborns in short and long-term outcomes. You also claim that if these evidence-based benefits could be administered in form of a drug, the common practice would most likely be to give this drug to the…
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If parents were a drug

Parents have a huge impact on stress and pain and thus the wellbeing of their infants during neonatal intensive care. If this effect could be achieved with a drug that has no side-effects, this drug would undoubtedly be standard of care. This drug is not available, while parents usually are. Although neonatal care has made tremendous improvements during the last years, impaired long-term neurodevelopmental outcome is still a major issue in infants that need intensive care treatment. Doctor Atle Moen…
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